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      Global Storm Tracking

      North Atlantic

      Time Category Swell Period Wind
      Sáb 23
      • 3
      43ft 16s 61mph
      Sex 29
      • 2
      42ft 15s 68mph
      Sex 29
      • 2
      37ft 14s 68mph
      Qua 03
      • 2
      37ft 15s 59mph
      Sex 05
      • 3
      44ft 16s 62mph
      Dom 07
      • 2
      38ft 15s 57mph

      South Atlantic

      Time Category Swell Period Wind
      Dom 24
      • 2
      36ft 15s 52mph
      Sáb 30
      • 2
      33ft 14s 59mph

      Indian Ocean

      Time Category Swell Period Wind
      Sáb 16
      • 2
      42ft 16s 56mph
      Seg 25
      • 2
      36ft 15s 55mph
      Sáb 30
      • 4
      52ft 15s 107mph
      Seg 25
      • 2
      35ft 15s 50mph
      Qui 28
      • 3
      45ft 17s 58mph
      Sáb 30
      • 2
      39ft 16s 57mph
      Dom 07
      • 3
      43ft 16s 57mph
      Dom 07
      • 2
      36ft 14s 54mph

      North Pacific

      Time Category Swell Period Wind
      Ter 26
      • 2
      33ft 14s 52mph
      Seg 25
      • 2
      35ft 14s 52mph
      Qui 04
      • 2
      35ft 16s 51mph
      Qui 28
      • 3
      43ft 16s 58mph
      Seg 01
      • 3
      43ft 16s 66mph

      South Pacific

      Time Category Swell Period Wind
      Seg 25
      • 2
      41ft 16s 57mph
      Ter 26
      • 3
      46ft 18s 56mph
      Seg 01
      • 2
      33ft 15s 49mph
      Ter 02
      • 2
      39ft 15s 58mph
      Seg 08
      • 2
      34ft 15s 49mph

      How does it work?

      We have our own super computer creating the full global swell model every six hours. Onto this process we've coupled an image recognition system that spots the biggest swells before you've even checked the charts, and pulls out all the details you need to know.

      What does it do?

      It gives you a heads up, in summary, of all the major storms around the world for the next two weeks and the swells they'll create. If you're a dedicated local you'll get an early warning on anything that's likely to create sizable swell - but even more so if you're a travelling big wave surfer or big wave surfing fan you'll be the first to know when the charts are looking likely to create something special. This is the BETA stage - imagine full swell alerts that respond not just to your local forecast but to the actual storms and swells that create those waves.

      How is it different?

      Your local forecast gives you a huge amount of information. But it misses a range of forecasting subtleties - directional spread, frequency bandwidth and other factors that experienced forecasters generally deduce by tracking back to the swell charts. Having a heads up when a significant storm is in the swell window of your local beach makes this cross-checking easier than ever.

      Why BETA?

      To our knowledge this has never been done before. Although the problem we're trying to solve is fairly obvious the technologies we've needed to knit together are anything but simple. We're tracking storms, but as surfers we're not interested in low pressure for it's own sake, but the swell it creates. With a single storm creating multiple swells breaking this down clearly is a challenge - only you can decide if we're getting it right.