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Mauritius + Réunion Surf Reports and Surf Forecasts

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Conditions Summary
  Ilôt Sancho
Star Star Star Star Star
9ft 17secs 221° 14mph ESE - Cross/offshore - 112°
 Black Rocks (Mauritius)
Star Star Star Star Star
7ft 17secs 223° 14mph ESE - Cross/offshore - 112°
 Darne
Grey Star Grey Star Grey Star
7ft 17secs 223° 14mph ESE - Onshore - 112°
 Graveyards (Mauritius)
Star Star Star Star Star
9ft 17secs 221° 14mph ESE - Cross/offshore - 112°
 Harbour Riviére Noire
Star Star Star Star Star
7ft 17secs 223° 14mph ESE - Offshore - 112°
 Macondé
Star Star Star Star Star
9ft 17secs 221° 14mph ESE - Cross/offshore - 112°
 Souillac
Star Star Star Grey Star Grey Star
9ft 17secs 221° 14mph ESE - Cross/onshore - 112°
Add a New Surf SpotRegional Overview
Smack bang in the path of the Roaring 40s swells heading across the Indian Ocean, the Mauritius and Réunion islands get their best and most consistent swell during the southern hemisphere winter. South-east trade winds blow for most of the year with some shifty conditions during the summer when winds will sometimes shift north-east, especially if tropical storms are heading from that direction. Both islands boast some classic reef set-ups with Réunion's St-Leu and Mauritius's Tamarin Bay being particular highlights. The latter supposedly suffering from heavy localism compounded by its inconsistency. The heaviest locals on both these islands are perhaps the sharks and attacks do happen. Sea temperatures range from 24 to 27ºC or 75 to 81ºF.
Find your Spot or other Local Information:
Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo
Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo
Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo
Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo Passe Jimmy. Photo
Local News
News Image Habagat’s Irony, The beauty and the destruction
With its typically placid waters the Davao Gulf is not known for any surfing grounds, however the month of August heralds a climatic exception when the placid waters give way to the monsoon waves of Habagat. The season lasts a little over a month and this year it has been one the most active monsoons for some time with large stretches of the coastline drastically altered by the ravages of the flooding waves and many unfortunate coastal communities having their lives turned upside down. Local victims of these erratic climatic patterns are substantiating what climatologists have started to term as collateral damage from western emissions. Few locals see any benefit from these changes and the damaging waves, but the angry forces of nature bring a paradox of both pleasure and pain. For the few local surfers the coastline was lit up. The power and beauty of nature’s energy in its most raw form unfolded upon their shores exposing how the coastline of Davao Gulf is perfectly moulded for the art and sport of Surfing
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